Competitions

The Physiological Society runs regular competitions for school teachers and students to engage with physiology and researchers of The Society.

Previous competitions

Year

Competition

Winner(s)

Prize(s)

2016

Ode to Physiology - poetry competition

Charlie Toogood (Under 10’s) and
Vismaya Kharkar (11-18s)

£50 Amazon gift voucher and a school visit

2015-2016

The Science of Life: How your body works

The winners are reported here.

Gold, Silver and Bronze awards, including a 'Train Like a Champion Day' at an EIS High Performance Centre

2015

Women in Physiology - poster competition

Elsie Moore (The Thomas Hardye School, Dorset)

£50 Amazon gift voucher, certificate and a visit from a female physiologist

2013-2014

The Science of Life: How your body works

The winners are reported here.

Gold, Silver and Bronze awards, including a live show by Science made simple

2012

The holy grail of human biology research

Oliver Neely (Tiffin School)

Entry published in Physiology News and £50 Amazon gift voucher

2011-2012

The Science of Sport: How to Win Gold

The winners are reported here.

Gold, Silver and Bronze awards, including a 'Train Like a Champion Day' at an EIS High Performance Centre

2011

Prize draw

St Michael’s School, Berkshire

Mobile Teaching Unit

2011

Suggest a benefit or resource that The Society could offer to School/College Contacts in the future which would be useful to teachers and/or students.

Eastwood Comprehensive School, Nottinghamshire

Mobile Teaching Unit

2010

Explain in no more than 100 words how your school would benefit from a visit from the MTU.

Spalding High School, Lincolnshire

Mobile Teaching Unit

2010

Prize draw

Tiffin School, Surrey

Mobile Teaching Unit

2010

Student competition: in no more than 200 words, explain why we use animals in research.

Izzy Raywood (The King’s School, Ely) and William Rhodes (Bedford School)

£50 Amazon gift voucher and £100 for the school

 

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